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News on the Lawyers and Legal Professionals of Texas
Updated: 2 days 6 hours ago

Texas Gavel Awards presented at FOIFT annual conference

Fri, 09/21/2018 - 15:12

From left: State Bar of Texas President Joe K. Longley; Jason Wheeler of WFAA-TV; Eleanor Dearman of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times; Anita Hassan, formerly of the Houston Chronicle; Jessica Savage and Veronica Flores of KRIS-TV, and Rudy England, chair of the SBOT Public Affairs Committee.

State Bar of Texas President Joe K. Longley and SBOT Public Affairs Committee Chair Rudy England welcomed journalists from around the state as winners of Texas Gavel Awards.

The Texas Gavel Awards recognize excellence in journalism that fosters public understanding of the legal system; educates the public about the rule of law, the legal profession, and the judicial branch of government; and discloses practices or procedures needing correction to improve the justice system.

Winners included Anita Hassan, formerly of the Houston Chronicle and now a member of an investigative team at the Las Vegas Review-Journal; Eleanor Dearman of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times; Krista M. Torralva, formerly of the Caller-Times and now a member of the San Antonio Express-News reporting staff; Jason Wheeler and Tanya Eiserer, both of WFAA; and Jessica Savage, Veronica Flores, Cameron Gorman, and Michael Salazar of KRIS-TV in Corpus Christi.

To read their winning entries and short bios of the recipients go to texasbar.com/gavelawards.

The awards were presented as part of the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas’ annual conference and awards luncheon. At that same luncheon, First Amendment attorney Laura Lee Prather was awarded the foundation’s James Madison Award. The award honors those who demonstrate outstanding commitment to upholding the principles of the First Amendment and open government.

Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar was keynote speaker at the luncheon.

Texas Gavel Awards presented at FOIFT annual conference

Fri, 09/21/2018 - 15:12

From left: State Bar of Texas President Joe K. Longley; Jason Wheeler of WFAA-TV; Eleanor Dearman of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times; Anita Hassan, formerly of the Houston Chronicle; Jessica Savage and Veronica Flores of KRIS-TV, and Rudy England, chair of the SBOT Public Affairs Committee.

State Bar of Texas President Joe K. Longley and SBOT Public Affairs Committee Chair Rudy England welcomed journalists from around the state as winners of Texas Gavel Awards.

The Texas Gavel Awards recognize excellence in journalism that fosters public understanding of the legal system; educates the public about the rule of law, the legal profession, and the judicial branch of government; and discloses practices or procedures needing correction to improve the justice system.

Winners included Anita Hassan, formerly of the Houston Chronicle and now a member of an investigative team at the Las Vegas Review-Journal; Eleanor Dearman of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times; Krista M. Torralva, formerly of the Caller-Times and now a member of the San Antonio Express-News reporting staff; Jason Wheeler and Tanya Eiserer, both of WFAA; and Jessica Savage, Veronica Flores, Cameron Gorman, and Michael Salazar of KRIS-TV in Corpus Christi.

To read their winning entries and short bios of the recipients go to texasbar.com/gavelawards.

The awards were presented as part of the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas’ annual conference and awards luncheon. At that same luncheon, First Amendment attorney Laura Lee Prather was awarded the foundation’s James Madison Award. The award honors those who demonstrate outstanding commitment to upholding the principles of the First Amendment and open government.

Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar was keynote speaker at the luncheon.

Texas Gavel Awards presented at FOIFT annual conference

Fri, 09/21/2018 - 15:12

From left: State Bar of Texas President Joe K. Longley; Jason Wheeler of WFAA-TV; Eleanor Dearman of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times; Anita Hassan, formerly of the Houston Chronicle; Jessica Savage and Veronica Flores of KRIS-TV, and Rudy England, chair of the SBOT Public Affairs Committee.

State Bar of Texas President Joe K. Longley and SBOT Public Affairs Committee Chair Rudy England welcomed journalists from around the state as winners of Texas Gavel Awards.

The Texas Gavel Awards recognize excellence in journalism that fosters public understanding of the legal system; educates the public about the rule of law, the legal profession, and the judicial branch of government; and discloses practices or procedures needing correction to improve the justice system.

Winners included Anita Hassan, formerly of the Houston Chronicle and now a member of an investigative team at the Las Vegas Review-Journal; Eleanor Dearman of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times; Krista M. Torralva, formerly of the Caller-Times and now a member of the San Antonio Express-News reporting staff; Jason Wheeler and Tanya Eiserer, both of WFAA; and Jessica Savage, Veronica Flores, Cameron Gorman, and Michael Salazar of KRIS-TV in Corpus Christi.

To read their winning entries and short bios of the recipients go to texasbar.com/gavelawards.

The awards were presented as part of the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas’ annual conference and awards luncheon. At that same luncheon, First Amendment attorney Laura Lee Prather was awarded the foundation’s James Madison Award. The award honors those who demonstrate outstanding commitment to upholding the principles of the First Amendment and open government.

Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar was keynote speaker at the luncheon.

State Bar Board of Directors to meet September 28 in Austin

Fri, 09/21/2018 - 13:35

The State Bar of Texas Board of Directors will hold its quarterly meeting Friday, September 28 in Austin.

The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Renaissance, 9721 Arboretum Blvd. Members of the public are welcome to attend.

Click here to view the meeting agenda and backup materials.

Discounts for home improvement

Fri, 09/21/2018 - 08:00

Your Member Benefit Program has everything you need to spruce up your home without breaking the bank. Check out the Home & Garden page for more info.

  • SunPower Solar — Solar power lowers your monthly electric bill and helps protect the earth for the next generation. When you sign up for a free home evaluation from SunPower, you’ll get a rebate of up to $1,000.
  • Whirlpool With Whirlpool’s Inside Pass Program, you can enjoy substantial savings on trusted appliances, accessories, and other products for your home. Perks include exclusive promotions, easy payment, and more.
  • ADT Authorized Dealers ADT provides innovative security products and services. Get a free ADT monitored home security system, an $850 value, when you sign up for a new ADT monitoring service with Safe Streets USA.
  • iRobot — State Bar of Texas members receive 15% off select iRobot home-cleaning robots. All robots come with a 30-day, money-back guarantee and a one-year limited warranty.
  • Corelle Brands — With the Corelle Brands Employee Purchase Program, you can save 20% on cooking and cutlery products. Available brands include Pyrex, CorningWare, and more.
  • Easy Canvas PrintsEasy Canvas Prints lets you turn your treasured photos into works of art. Enjoy free shipping and 75% off a range of sizes.
  • Finecraft RugsThe Finecraft Designer Rugs collection includes rugs from Belgium, Turkey, and India. State Bar of Texas members save 50%.

Current offers provided by Beneplace.

For more information on other discounts you’re eligible for as a member of the State Bar of Texas, visit texasbar.com/benefits.

Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange
The Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange is a multi-carrier private exchange designed for State Bar of Texas members and their staff and dependents. Available to both individuals and employer groups, the exchange offers a wide range of health insurance choices and more.

State Bar of Texas – Benefits & Services

Discounts for home improvement

Fri, 09/21/2018 - 08:00

Your Member Benefit Program has everything you need to spruce up your home without breaking the bank. Check out the Home & Garden page for more info.

  • SunPower Solar — Solar power lowers your monthly electric bill and helps protect the earth for the next generation. When you sign up for a free home evaluation from SunPower, you’ll get a rebate of up to $1,000.
  • Whirlpool With Whirlpool’s Inside Pass Program, you can enjoy substantial savings on trusted appliances, accessories, and other products for your home. Perks include exclusive promotions, easy payment, and more.
  • ADT Authorized Dealers ADT provides innovative security products and services. Get a free ADT monitored home security system, an $850 value, when you sign up for a new ADT monitoring service with Safe Streets USA.
  • iRobot — State Bar of Texas members receive 15% off select iRobot home-cleaning robots. All robots come with a 30-day, money-back guarantee and a one-year limited warranty.
  • Corelle Brands — With the Corelle Brands Employee Purchase Program, you can save 20% on cooking and cutlery products. Available brands include Pyrex, CorningWare, and more.
  • Easy Canvas PrintsEasy Canvas Prints lets you turn your treasured photos into works of art. Enjoy free shipping and 75% off a range of sizes.
  • Finecraft RugsThe Finecraft Designer Rugs collection includes rugs from Belgium, Turkey, and India. State Bar of Texas members save 50%.

Current offers provided by Beneplace.

For more information on other discounts you’re eligible for as a member of the State Bar of Texas, visit texasbar.com/benefits.

Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange
The Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange is a multi-carrier private exchange designed for State Bar of Texas members and their staff and dependents. Available to both individuals and employer groups, the exchange offers a wide range of health insurance choices and more.

State Bar of Texas – Benefits & Services

Discounts for home improvement

Fri, 09/21/2018 - 08:00

Your Member Benefit Program has everything you need to spruce up your home without breaking the bank. Check out the Home & Garden page for more info.

  • SunPower Solar — Solar power lowers your monthly electric bill and helps protect the earth for the next generation. When you sign up for a free home evaluation from SunPower, you’ll get a rebate of up to $1,000.
  • Whirlpool With Whirlpool’s Inside Pass Program, you can enjoy substantial savings on trusted appliances, accessories, and other products for your home. Perks include exclusive promotions, easy payment, and more.
  • ADT Authorized Dealers ADT provides innovative security products and services. Get a free ADT monitored home security system, an $850 value, when you sign up for a new ADT monitoring service with Safe Streets USA.
  • iRobot — State Bar of Texas members receive 15% off select iRobot home-cleaning robots. All robots come with a 30-day, money-back guarantee and a one-year limited warranty.
  • Corelle Brands — With the Corelle Brands Employee Purchase Program, you can save 20% on cooking and cutlery products. Available brands include Pyrex, CorningWare, and more.
  • Easy Canvas PrintsEasy Canvas Prints lets you turn your treasured photos into works of art. Enjoy free shipping and 75% off a range of sizes.
  • Finecraft RugsThe Finecraft Designer Rugs collection includes rugs from Belgium, Turkey, and India. State Bar of Texas members save 50%.

Current offers provided by Beneplace.

For more information on other discounts you’re eligible for as a member of the State Bar of Texas, visit texasbar.com/benefits.

Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange
The Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange is a multi-carrier private exchange designed for State Bar of Texas members and their staff and dependents. Available to both individuals and employer groups, the exchange offers a wide range of health insurance choices and more.

State Bar of Texas – Benefits & Services

Hours for a Cause provides innovative way for attorneys to help

Thu, 09/20/2018 - 08:00

It’s no secret that the Texas legal community provides pro bono services, helping those in need. But while attorneys across the state may want to offer their assistance, they may not always have the time or necessary skills to do so. That’s where Hours for a Cause steps in. The website encourages lawyers to pledge to donate a day of billable hours to an organization that provides pro bono services.

Through the website, attorneys fill out an online pledge form, committing to match pay from a work day toward a nonprofit legal service organization that provides pro bono services. The site currently focuses on organizations that are helping with immigration issues, such as American Gateways, Kids in Need of Defense, and Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services.

Hours for a Cause was created by Liz Nielsen, of Austin-based Nielsen Law. During the recent family separation crisis, Nielsen wanted to help but needed to get creative with her busy estate-planning practice and lack of knowledge on immigration. Her solution: to donate a day of her billable time to a legal services organization that provides pro bono services to asylum seekers.

“It occurred to me that there were probably lots of attorneys like me, who wanted to give back in the wake of the immigration crisis but didn’t have the time or skills to provide pro bono legal representation,” Nielsen said.

She then created Hours for a Cause so that other attorneys could pledge to support causes they feel passionate about. Hours for a Cause sends out email reminders about pledges. Attorneys are instructed to donate directly with their preferred organizations.

For more information on Hours for a Cause and how to donate, go to hoursforacause.com.

Stories of Recovery: A colleague’s suicide inspires attorney to join the Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program

Wed, 09/19/2018 - 15:05

Editor’s Note: The following “Stories of Recovery” post was originally published in September 2017. We are republishing it in recognition of National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. The Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program offers confidential assistance for lawyers, law students, and judges with substance abuse or mental health issues. Call TLAP at 1-800-343-8527 (TLAP) and find more information at tlaphelps.org.

Another trip, another deposition. This run to Phoenix was so ordinary, except that I was traveling in July, and the temperature would be well above 100 degrees for the few days I was there. When my plane landed, I took 10 steps into the airport, and my client called. I first assumed that he was calling me about the plaintiff’s deposition that would occur the next day, but then I noticed the urgency in his voice. My mind immediately went someplace negative, with thoughts of my client, or one of his close family members, being diagnosed with cancer. My client asked me where I was—in the airport, near a Starbucks—and then asked me to step away from the crowds.

He followed with the unthinkable: his friend and mine, let’s call him Todd, a successful litigator at one of Big City’s most prestigious law firms, had committed suicide. Todd was also my co-counsel on numerous lawsuits for this client. Together, we had a virtual team that involved both of our firms, working collaboratively and effectively to serve our client. Todd was married, had three beautiful children, a sterling academic record, and an enviable career. I was shocked, and suddenly alone in my thoughts in the busy airport.

The next day, the deposition occurred as planned. The plaintiffs’ counsel and many of the defense counsel knew Todd, and they were equally perplexed. During a break in the deposition, I called one of Todd’s law partners, a former law school classmate, to ask him to keep me apprised of the funeral services and, discretely, but less so than I’d hoped, to ask if he knew why Todd committed suicide. He told me that he and his law partners were stunned. Todd’s death was unimaginable to them.

Later that week, I attended Todd’s funeral. I saw his wife, children, siblings, law partners, and friends. I ached, knowing that they all loved Todd and were devastated by his unexpected and tragic death.

I left Todd’s funeral with a profound and deep sadness. Although it was not even noon, I knew I had to go home. I had to see my wife and see my children when they came home from school. I told my wife that the overriding emotion I felt was like someone standing right next to me was struck by lighting and killed. Todd’s death was that close to me, owing to our friendship, working relationship as co-counsel, and, because, he, like me, was a litigation partner in a large Big City law firm.

Unlike me, Todd always seemed like someone who really loved the law, practicing it, and just being a great lawyer. Today, I am very grateful to be a member of the bar, and for the life afforded me by the practice of law, but I certainly understand what it means to struggle with one’s career.

Days later, I called the incoming State Bar president and asked if I could serve on the bar’s Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program Committee. I explained why I wanted to serve and that I wanted to focus my efforts on mental health and suicide prevention for Texas lawyers. Without hesitation, the incoming president agreed to appoint me to the TLAP Committee.

During my service with TLAP, there has been much progress, but, sadly and regrettably, there have been more suicides by lawyers like Todd—men and women who, for a variety of reasons, have seen their demise as the only solution to their darkness. Fortunately TLAP also has tremendous success in preventing further tragedies. In addition to established, confidential, and successful programs to assist Texas lawyers, law students, and judges with addiction, TLAP has spread the message of mental health, wellness, and suicide prevention to law schools, judicial meetings, the State Bar Annual Meeting, and presentations at law firms and bar associations.

Not many years ago, it was unthinkable to consider TLAP coming to a law firm, greeted with open arms, and having a frank, yet hopeful, exchange about mental health and suicide prevention with Texas lawyers. In the past, law schools would shudder at the thought of the next generation of Texas lawyers being offered such information. Yet today, mental health and suicide prevention within the legal profession are discussed, shared, and exchanged at bar association meetings, law firms, law schools, judicial conferences, and the State Bar of Texas Annual Meeting.

It is too late for my friend Todd to benefit from TLAP’s focus on mental health and suicide prevention. However, it is not too late for other Texas lawyers. I am hopeful that increased access to information and counseling will prevent another needless, painful loss.

For more information on suicide warning signs and prevention, go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention at afsp.org or facebook.com/AFSPnational. For the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, call (800) 273-TALK (8255).

Stories of Recovery: A colleague’s suicide inspires attorney to join the Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program

Wed, 09/19/2018 - 15:05

Editor’s Note: The following “Stories of Recovery” post was originally published in September 2017. We are republishing it in recognition of National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. The Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program offers confidential assistance for lawyers, law students, and judges with substance abuse or mental health issues. Call TLAP at 1-800-343-8527 (TLAP) and find more information at tlaphelps.org.

Another trip, another deposition. This run to Phoenix was so ordinary, except that I was traveling in July, and the temperature would be well above 100 degrees for the few days I was there. When my plane landed, I took 10 steps into the airport, and my client called. I first assumed that he was calling me about the plaintiff’s deposition that would occur the next day, but then I noticed the urgency in his voice. My mind immediately went someplace negative, with thoughts of my client, or one of his close family members, being diagnosed with cancer. My client asked me where I was—in the airport, near a Starbucks—and then asked me to step away from the crowds.

He followed with the unthinkable: his friend and mine, let’s call him Todd, a successful litigator at one of Big City’s most prestigious law firms, had committed suicide. Todd was also my co-counsel on numerous lawsuits for this client. Together, we had a virtual team that involved both of our firms, working collaboratively and effectively to serve our client. Todd was married, had three beautiful children, a sterling academic record, and an enviable career. I was shocked, and suddenly alone in my thoughts in the busy airport.

The next day, the deposition occurred as planned. The plaintiffs’ counsel and many of the defense counsel knew Todd, and they were equally perplexed. During a break in the deposition, I called one of Todd’s law partners, a former law school classmate, to ask him to keep me apprised of the funeral services and, discretely, but less so than I’d hoped, to ask if he knew why Todd committed suicide. He told me that he and his law partners were stunned. Todd’s death was unimaginable to them.

Later that week, I attended Todd’s funeral. I saw his wife, children, siblings, law partners, and friends. I ached, knowing that they all loved Todd and were devastated by his unexpected and tragic death.

I left Todd’s funeral with a profound and deep sadness. Although it was not even noon, I knew I had to go home. I had to see my wife and see my children when they came home from school. I told my wife that the overriding emotion I felt was like someone standing right next to me was struck by lighting and killed. Todd’s death was that close to me, owing to our friendship, working relationship as co-counsel, and, because, he, like me, was a litigation partner in a large Big City law firm.

Unlike me, Todd always seemed like someone who really loved the law, practicing it, and just being a great lawyer. Today, I am very grateful to be a member of the bar, and for the life afforded me by the practice of law, but I certainly understand what it means to struggle with one’s career.

Days later, I called the incoming State Bar president and asked if I could serve on the bar’s Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program Committee. I explained why I wanted to serve and that I wanted to focus my efforts on mental health and suicide prevention for Texas lawyers. Without hesitation, the incoming president agreed to appoint me to the TLAP Committee.

During my service with TLAP, there has been much progress, but, sadly and regrettably, there have been more suicides by lawyers like Todd—men and women who, for a variety of reasons, have seen their demise as the only solution to their darkness. Fortunately TLAP also has tremendous success in preventing further tragedies. In addition to established, confidential, and successful programs to assist Texas lawyers, law students, and judges with addiction, TLAP has spread the message of mental health, wellness, and suicide prevention to law schools, judicial meetings, the State Bar Annual Meeting, and presentations at law firms and bar associations.

Not many years ago, it was unthinkable to consider TLAP coming to a law firm, greeted with open arms, and having a frank, yet hopeful, exchange about mental health and suicide prevention with Texas lawyers. In the past, law schools would shudder at the thought of the next generation of Texas lawyers being offered such information. Yet today, mental health and suicide prevention within the legal profession are discussed, shared, and exchanged at bar association meetings, law firms, law schools, judicial conferences, and the State Bar of Texas Annual Meeting.

It is too late for my friend Todd to benefit from TLAP’s focus on mental health and suicide prevention. However, it is not too late for other Texas lawyers. I am hopeful that increased access to information and counseling will prevent another needless, painful loss.

For more information on suicide warning signs and prevention, go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention at afsp.org or facebook.com/AFSPnational. For the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, call (800) 273-TALK (8255).

Stories of Recovery: A colleague’s suicide inspires attorney to join the Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program

Wed, 09/19/2018 - 15:05

Editor’s Note: The following “Stories of Recovery” post was originally published in September 2017. We are republishing it in recognition of National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. The Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program offers confidential assistance for lawyers, law students, and judges with substance abuse or mental health issues. Call TLAP at 1-800-343-8527 (TLAP) and find more information at tlaphelps.org.

Another trip, another deposition. This run to Phoenix was so ordinary, except that I was traveling in July, and the temperature would be well above 100 degrees for the few days I was there. When my plane landed, I took 10 steps into the airport, and my client called. I first assumed that he was calling me about the plaintiff’s deposition that would occur the next day, but then I noticed the urgency in his voice. My mind immediately went someplace negative, with thoughts of my client, or one of his close family members, being diagnosed with cancer. My client asked me where I was—in the airport, near a Starbucks—and then asked me to step away from the crowds.

He followed with the unthinkable: his friend and mine, let’s call him Todd, a successful litigator at one of Big City’s most prestigious law firms, had committed suicide. Todd was also my co-counsel on numerous lawsuits for this client. Together, we had a virtual team that involved both of our firms, working collaboratively and effectively to serve our client. Todd was married, had three beautiful children, a sterling academic record, and an enviable career. I was shocked, and suddenly alone in my thoughts in the busy airport.

The next day, the deposition occurred as planned. The plaintiffs’ counsel and many of the defense counsel knew Todd, and they were equally perplexed. During a break in the deposition, I called one of Todd’s law partners, a former law school classmate, to ask him to keep me apprised of the funeral services and, discretely, but less so than I’d hoped, to ask if he knew why Todd committed suicide. He told me that he and his law partners were stunned. Todd’s death was unimaginable to them.

Later that week, I attended Todd’s funeral. I saw his wife, children, siblings, law partners, and friends. I ached, knowing that they all loved Todd and were devastated by his unexpected and tragic death.

I left Todd’s funeral with a profound and deep sadness. Although it was not even noon, I knew I had to go home. I had to see my wife and see my children when they came home from school. I told my wife that the overriding emotion I felt was like someone standing right next to me was struck by lighting and killed. Todd’s death was that close to me, owing to our friendship, working relationship as co-counsel, and, because, he, like me, was a litigation partner in a large Big City law firm.

Unlike me, Todd always seemed like someone who really loved the law, practicing it, and just being a great lawyer. Today, I am very grateful to be a member of the bar, and for the life afforded me by the practice of law, but I certainly understand what it means to struggle with one’s career.

Days later, I called the incoming State Bar president and asked if I could serve on the bar’s Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program Committee. I explained why I wanted to serve and that I wanted to focus my efforts on mental health and suicide prevention for Texas lawyers. Without hesitation, the incoming president agreed to appoint me to the TLAP Committee.

During my service with TLAP, there has been much progress, but, sadly and regrettably, there have been more suicides by lawyers like Todd—men and women who, for a variety of reasons, have seen their demise as the only solution to their darkness. Fortunately TLAP also has tremendous success in preventing further tragedies. In addition to established, confidential, and successful programs to assist Texas lawyers, law students, and judges with addiction, TLAP has spread the message of mental health, wellness, and suicide prevention to law schools, judicial meetings, the State Bar Annual Meeting, and presentations at law firms and bar associations.

Not many years ago, it was unthinkable to consider TLAP coming to a law firm, greeted with open arms, and having a frank, yet hopeful, exchange about mental health and suicide prevention with Texas lawyers. In the past, law schools would shudder at the thought of the next generation of Texas lawyers being offered such information. Yet today, mental health and suicide prevention within the legal profession are discussed, shared, and exchanged at bar association meetings, law firms, law schools, judicial conferences, and the State Bar of Texas Annual Meeting.

It is too late for my friend Todd to benefit from TLAP’s focus on mental health and suicide prevention. However, it is not too late for other Texas lawyers. I am hopeful that increased access to information and counseling will prevent another needless, painful loss.

For more information on suicide warning signs and prevention, go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention at afsp.org or facebook.com/AFSPnational. For the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, call (800) 273-TALK (8255).

Austin and Dallas area banks join TAJF Prime Partner Bank program

Wed, 09/19/2018 - 08:00

The Texas Brand Bank of Dallas and the Austin Capital Bank have joined the Texas Access to Justice Foundation’s, or TAJF, Prime Partner Bank program. The program brings together more banks and credit unions to add to available funding to the Interest on Lawyers’ Trust Accounts, or IOLTA, which helps aid low-income Texans facing civil legal issues.

Partnering institutions pay higher interest rates for IOLTA, where funds are held until they are available to a client. TAJF also uses money in these accounts to distribute grants to legal aid providers in Texas. Each year, IOLTA funds provide legal assistance to more than 150,000 Texas families.

“Many Texans face serious legal issues, such as escaping situations of domestic violence or avoiding foreclosure, and simply do not have the resources to hire an attorney,” said Richard L. Tate, chair of the TAJF Board of Directors. “By paying higher interest rates on IOLTA accounts, Texas Brand Bank is helping ensure that low-income Texans have access to life-saving civil legal services.”

Because of a 70 percent decline in IOLTA revenue since 2007, $140 million in funding has been lost, making Prime Partner Bank vital to efforts in providing free legal services for low-income and disadvantaged Texans. The combined efforts of partners like Austin Capital Bank and the Texas Brand Bank of Dallas pay 75 percent of IOLTA accounts’ federal funds target rate interest.

“Austin Capital Bank was built on a foundation of helping the community it serves,” said bank CEO and president Erik Beguin in a press release. “We are excited to join the Prime Partner Bank program and help make a positive impact on the lives of disadvantaged Texans who need affordable legal assistance.”

More than 5.6 million Texans qualify for legal aid, though many are turned away because providers don’t have the resources to help everyone. Prime Partner banks are vital in reaching those who providers cannot cover.

“Texas Brand Bank, with three offices in the Dallas metropolitan area, is an active supporter of numerous organizations in our local community” said bank president William E. Lowe in a press release. “We are excited to participate in the Prime Partner Bank program to help make an impact on the lives of disadvantaged Texans who need legal assistance.”

For more information on Prime Partner Bank and its nearly 60 participating institutions, go to teajf.org/financial_institutions/prime_partners.aspx.

Sponsored Content: Read These 7 Articles to Improve Your Law Firm

Tue, 09/18/2018 - 23:01

If you’re looking for new ideas to better your law firm, we’ve got you covered with one handy list of articles to read.

Whether you’re looking to improve your law firm’s billing practices, rethink your client intake, or buy a new scanner, this list has something for every firm. Read on for inspiration and ideas to improve your law firm this summer.

1. Improve your billing and collections

According to the 2017 Legal Trends Report, 59% of lawyers regularly deal with late payments. Even worse, lawyers are only getting paid for 86% of the hours they bill to clients. Luckily, Amy Mann of LawPay has a few tips to help you collect more, faster. Get her list.

2. Conduct eDiscovery the smart way

How much time does your firm spend on eDiscovery? A streamlined process can help you review documents and find what you need efficiently—with fewer errors and items missed. Casey Sullivan of Logikcull explains how to set up a strong eDiscovery process for any firm.

3. Think through each stage of client intake

There’s more than one step to cover when it comes to client intake. From your initial connection, to your first consultation, to getting your engagement letter signed, every interaction is important for getting hired and onboarding new clients smoothly. Aaron George of Lexicata describes  how to conduct each stage of client onboarding efficiently.

4. Level-up your legal research skills

Legal research can be one of the most time-consuming tasks you face as a lawyer—but there’s no need to spend more time researching than you need to. Jeff Asjes and Brock Foley of Fastcase assemble a list of legal research tips to help you flex your fingertips and get the most out of every search.

5. Experiment with outsourcing

Want to try outsourcing legal services at your law firm, but not sure where to start? Kristin Tyler and Talitha Gray Kozlowski of LAWCLERK share everything you need to know about outsourcing—including examples of tasks to be outsourced and companies to turn to—in one convenient place.

6. Choose a better scanner

It’s a paperless world out there: To embrace the digital revolution, your firm has to have a top-notch scanner that meets its needs. Luckily, the folks at Fujitsu have put together a handy list of considerations for any firm before purchasing a scanner.

7. Cover your marketing bases

When it comes to law firm marketing, the sheer volume of information and tactics to try can be overwhelming. From SEO, to web design, to social media, it can be hard to know where to begin. Adam Callahan of ONE400 helpfully lays out the basics, so you can stop wading through marketing articles and start creating a cohesive law firm marketing plan.

Posts featured here were written by sponsors of the 2018 Clio Cloud Conference. Attend the conference to meet them in person!

Houston attorneys, judges reading at 100 schools for Constitution Day

Mon, 09/17/2018 - 12:00

More than 100 Houston Bar Association volunteers are expected to read to classes in 100 elementary schools in the Houston area today for Constitution Day.

Attorneys and judges are reading and discussing the book Grace for President by Kelly DiPucchio to elementary school students at 21 school districts at designated times throughout the day.

Constitution Day commemorates the signing of the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787. Educators are encouraged to teach students about one of the most important and influential events in American history.

The Houston Bar Association each year provides reading programs and other activities in Harris County schools on Constitution Day.

Readings are being held throughout the day at schools in Aldine, Alief, Alvin, Channelview, Conroe, Cy-Fair, Deer Park, Fort Bend, Galena Park, Goose Creek, Houston, Humble, Katy, Lamar Consolidated, Pasadena, Pearland, Sheldon, Spring Branch, Spring, and Stafford school districts, as well as some private schools.

The Houston Bar Association has 11,000 members, making it the nation’s fifth-largest metropolitan bar association. It provides professional development, education, and service programs for the legal profession and the community.

Lawyers: Learn about health insurance options at free Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange luncheons

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 17:07

The Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange will discuss health insurance options for 2019 and offer free lunch to all attendees at upcoming meetings in Austin, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio.

Texas Member Benefits, Inc. has launched a new exclusive plan on the exchange that allows small and large firms to pool their risk as one large group for lower fees, regardless if your firm has two or more employees.

The 2019 national open enrollment period for individual health insurance coverage is November 1 through December 15 for a coverage start date of January 1, 2019.

Space is limited. The first 120 respondents for each event will receive a confirmation email. Please submit any questions to memberbenefits@texasbar.com.

All luncheons start at noon and will be held on September 18 at the Texas Law Center in Austin, September 19 at the Institute of Texan Cultures in San Antonio, September 24 at the Houston Bar Association, and September 26 at the Aloft Dallas Downtown.

Please RSVP to each event by city: Austin, San Antonio, Houston and Dallas.

The Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange is a multicarrier exchange launched by the State Bar of Texas as a clearinghouse for health insurance choices and other benefits for bar members, their staffs, and dependents.

Dallas Bar Association to hold Diversity Summit

Fri, 09/14/2018 - 08:00

The Dallas Bar Association’s Diversity Summit will promote diversity and inclusion in the Dallas community on Friday, Sept. 21, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Pavilion at the Belo Mansion, 2101 Ross Ave., Dallas 75201.

The legal community, students, and public are invited to attend to give input and suggestions on how to increase diversity across all professions and how to implement programs in their communities.

“The summit will bring together great minds with long-standing careers who have seen the American justice system evolve alongside young minds who deal with today’s social media, perceptions, and techno-society to generate ideas on how we can improve our institutions and our daily lives,” said Diversity Summit Chair Rhonda Hunter. “Talking about our faults and deciding what we can do to overcome them can lead our diverse city to be an exemplary beacon of light for the country. The Diversity Summit will provide an atmosphere of encouragement for each of us to be agents of change for an improved world.”

Speakers include:

• Elizabeth Alvarez, of the Law Office of Elizabeth Alvarez
• Nnamdi Anozie, of White, Wiggins & Barnes
• Dennis W. Archers, of Dickinson Wright, and former American Bar Association president
• Marilyn F. Booker, of Morgan Stanley
• Brittany Barnett-Byrd, of the Buried Alive Project
• Liz Cedillo-Pereira, of the city of Dallas
• CeCe Cox, of the Resource Center
• Lacy Durham, of Deloitte Tax
• Hilda C. Galvan, of Jones Day
• Rhonda Hunter, of the Dallas County District Attorney’s Office (Juvenile Division), and past DBA president
• Michael K. Hurst, of Lynn Pinker Cox & Hurst, and DBA president
• Regina Montoya, of JMC Strategy Group
• Hon. Tonya Parker, of the 116th District Court
• Sheron C. Patterson, of the Hamilton Park United Methodist Church
• Sandra Phillips Rogers, of Toyota Motor North America, Inc.
• Garcia Sanford, of the Momentous Institute
• Julia A. Simon, of Mary Kay Inc.

“Taking on the critical issues of diversity and inclusion both in our profession and the broader community through this transformative Diversity Summit is paramount during my presidency,” said DBA President Michael K. Hurst. “As the DBA, we need to be loud and proud that we are leaders in these efforts and demonstrate that diversity does not take place without the inclusion of all people regardless of race, gender, color, religion, ethnicity, and orientation. We will discuss and celebrate both our differences and our commonality on September 21 and continue exponentially thereafter.”

Registration is free. For more information, go to dallasbar.org/diversitysummit.

Sponsored Content: Credit Card Mythbusting: 7 Reasons Law Firms Still Resist Online Payments

Tue, 09/11/2018 - 23:01

Credit cards have officially become the preferred way to pay, with people able to make purchases practically wherever they are thanks to smartphones and laptops. While this has been great news for most industries, some lawyers and other professionals are still hesitant to jump on the bandwagon, for a variety reasons. In this post, we’ll dispel seven common misconceptions about accepting credit cards online as payment for legal services.

“Credit cards are too expensive.”

There’s no denying it—if you accept credit cards as payment for your services, you’ll have to deal with credit card processing fees. Why? Plain and simple, there’s a cost to move money in our financial system. Either way, more and more professionals accept that this is simply one cost of running a modern business today. After all, wouldn’t you rather get paid instantly via credit cards instead of waiting for a check to arrive several days later—or worse yet, not at all? The impact of faster payments and increased cash flow offsets late payments and the processing fees associated with credit cards.

This certainly isn’t the first time an industry has had to make changes due to technological advances. However, once most businesses have adjusted to the latest tech, they find that their daily operations are faster and more efficient than before. In fact, lawyers who have made the switch to online credit card payments have told us that, in actuality, the time they save is much more valuable than the fees they pay. Plus, the ability to go paperless will save you both time and money.

“Online payments will only make my practice more complicated.”

You might think adding another way for your firm to get paid will come with a learning curve. The truth is, however, a good online payment solution will actually make running your practice easier than before! By accepting online payments, you’ll be able to quickly send your bills via email and your clients will be able to pay you instantly—no more waiting for checks to arrive in the mail. After using LawPay, Cheryl Ischy, a legal assistant at the Law Offices of Claude E. Decloux, told us, “I sent out bills first thing in the morning and over half were paid by lunch! LawPay made my day!”

While all online payment solutions charge a fee to process payments, the best payment solutions will only debit these fees at the beginning of the following month (rather than on a weekly or even daily basis.) This way, your deposit reports will show 100 percent of the payments you received, which will make reconciliation less complicated.

“My clients have no desire to pay me with their credit cards.”

Think about the world we live in today. More and more customers are shopping online for everything from clothes to paper towels to cars. Ecommerce giants like Amazon and Ebay have completely changed how people prefer to shop and, more importantly, how they prefer to pay. You won’t find a “Mail check” option on their websites. In fact, a recent study showed that as much as 75 percent of customers prefer to pay with a credit or debit card. Studies have also shown that 74 percent of households are now paying all of their bills online, and over half of consumers today don’t carry checkbooks (or rarely do).

The bottom line? Your clients would love the opportunity to pay for your services with their credit cards. Allowing them to make payments online with a few clicks of a button will make it easier for them to pay you, which leads to fewer late payments and more satisfied clients overall. It’s a win-win for both of you!

“Credit cards are for retail, not lawyers.”

This is a bit of an outdated school of thought. When credit cards were still an emerging form of payment, most lawyers saw them as “unprofessional,” being reserved strictly for point-of-sale businesses like restaurants or bars. Of course, as we’ve covered earlier, credit cards have now become the most popular way for customers to pay for goods and services. As much as 79 percent of today’s clients expect professional services to let them pay with their cards, according to a recent study.

In other words, the opposite of this misconception is now true—if you don’t offer clients the convenience of paying for your services online with a credit or debit card, you risk being seen as unprofessional.

“I don’t know enough about computers to accept online payments.”

Despite the numerous benefits of online payment options, you may feel you’re not tech savvy enough to implement an online payment system.

Don’t fret! If you know how to send an email, then you can use online payments. Additionally, if there’s anything you’re unfamiliar with, the best online payment solutions have dedicated and responsive support teams that can answer all of your questions. They’ll even walk you through the steps of setting up a payment page on your website, so your clients can easily pay your bill online at their convenience.

After using LawPay for two years, attorney Deirdre O’Donnell told us that it “just takes the complexity of accepting credit cards right out of the process. We think it saves time for them and it certainly saves time for us. I think our collection rates have really improved since we’ve had LawPay.”

“Online credit card payments are unsafe.”

As a lawyer, you’re already well aware of how important it is to keep your clients’ sensitive personal information safe. Naturally, when you accept credit cards as payments, you’ll need to protect their card data as well. However, keeping such data stored in your office, even on your work computer, can create a security risk.

Thankfully, online payment solutions can keep this data secure so you don’t have to. Look for an online payment solution that’s Payment Card Industry (PCI) Level 1 certified—the highest designation possible. These payment solutions are well equipped to protect payment data and will employ sophisticated security measures that your firm would otherwise not have access to. By letting your clients pay you through a secure online payment solution, you can take much of the liability of data security off your plate and place it in the hands of trusted security professionals. You’ll not only get a payment processor, but a payment data security specialist—all in one!

“I can’t accept credit cards and maintain IOLTA compliance.”

We hear you. You’re concerned about how credit card payments would work in light of the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct.

According to Rule 1.15, lawyers must be careful to ensure earned funds are deposited into an operating account, while a client’s funds go to a trust account. When accepting cash, checks, or other traditional forms of payment, it’s simply a matter of depositing the funds in the right place, but how does this work when using a credit card?

This is how an online payment solution designed specifically for legal professionals can make credit card payments both easy and ethical. For example, when payments are made through LawPay, your earned and unearned fees are always separated and deposited into their proper accounts. You can also rest easy knowing that LawPay will never allow any third-party debiting to occur from your IOLTA account.

If you want to accept credit cards without getting into hot water, your best bet is to use an online payment solution that understands the legal industry and was built from the ground up to anticipate and accommodate your needs.

These days, accepting online credit card payments is an essential part of running a modern law firm. Thankfully, it’s not only easier than ever to offer this option, but the benefits are overwhelming—simpler workflows, increased cash flow, better productivity in your firm, and best of all, happier clients who pay on-time and more frequently. What more could a lawyer ask for?

Ready to take your first step into the world of credit card payments? Get a head start with LawPay’s sample credit card authorization forms that you can use as part of your client intake forms.

Download now

Sponsored Content: Credit Card Mythbusting: 7 Reasons Law Firms Still Resist Online Payments

Tue, 09/11/2018 - 23:01

Credit cards have officially become the preferred way to pay, with people able to make purchases practically wherever they are thanks to smartphones and laptops. While this has been great news for most industries, some lawyers and other professionals are still hesitant to jump on the bandwagon, for a variety reasons. In this post, we’ll dispel seven common misconceptions about accepting credit cards online as payment for legal services.

“Credit cards are too expensive.”

There’s no denying it—if you accept credit cards as payment for your services, you’ll have to deal with credit card processing fees. Why? Plain and simple, there’s a cost to move money in our financial system. Either way, more and more professionals accept that this is simply one cost of running a modern business today. After all, wouldn’t you rather get paid instantly via credit cards instead of waiting for a check to arrive several days later—or worse yet, not at all? The impact of faster payments and increased cash flow offsets late payments and the processing fees associated with credit cards.

This certainly isn’t the first time an industry has had to make changes due to technological advances. However, once most businesses have adjusted to the latest tech, they find that their daily operations are faster and more efficient than before. In fact, lawyers who have made the switch to online credit card payments have told us that, in actuality, the time they save is much more valuable than the fees they pay. Plus, the ability to go paperless will save you both time and money.

“Online payments will only make my practice more complicated.”

You might think adding another way for your firm to get paid will come with a learning curve. The truth is, however, a good online payment solution will actually make running your practice easier than before! By accepting online payments, you’ll be able to quickly send your bills via email and your clients will be able to pay you instantly—no more waiting for checks to arrive in the mail. After using LawPay, Cheryl Ischy, a legal assistant at the Law Offices of Claude E. Decloux, told us, “I sent out bills first thing in the morning and over half were paid by lunch! LawPay made my day!”

While all online payment solutions charge a fee to process payments, the best payment solutions will only debit these fees at the beginning of the following month (rather than on a weekly or even daily basis.) This way, your deposit reports will show 100 percent of the payments you received, which will make reconciliation less complicated.

“My clients have no desire to pay me with their credit cards.”

Think about the world we live in today. More and more customers are shopping online for everything from clothes to paper towels to cars. Ecommerce giants like Amazon and Ebay have completely changed how people prefer to shop and, more importantly, how they prefer to pay. You won’t find a “Mail check” option on their websites. In fact, a recent study showed that as much as 75 percent of customers prefer to pay with a credit or debit card. Studies have also shown that 74 percent of households are now paying all of their bills online, and over half of consumers today don’t carry checkbooks (or rarely do).

The bottom line? Your clients would love the opportunity to pay for your services with their credit cards. Allowing them to make payments online with a few clicks of a button will make it easier for them to pay you, which leads to fewer late payments and more satisfied clients overall. It’s a win-win for both of you!

“Credit cards are for retail, not lawyers.”

This is a bit of an outdated school of thought. When credit cards were still an emerging form of payment, most lawyers saw them as “unprofessional,” being reserved strictly for point-of-sale businesses like restaurants or bars. Of course, as we’ve covered earlier, credit cards have now become the most popular way for customers to pay for goods and services. As much as 79 percent of today’s clients expect professional services to let them pay with their cards, according to a recent study.

In other words, the opposite of this misconception is now true—if you don’t offer clients the convenience of paying for your services online with a credit or debit card, you risk being seen as unprofessional.

“I don’t know enough about computers to accept online payments.”

Despite the numerous benefits of online payment options, you may feel you’re not tech savvy enough to implement an online payment system.

Don’t fret! If you know how to send an email, then you can use online payments. Additionally, if there’s anything you’re unfamiliar with, the best online payment solutions have dedicated and responsive support teams that can answer all of your questions. They’ll even walk you through the steps of setting up a payment page on your website, so your clients can easily pay your bill online at their convenience.

After using LawPay for two years, attorney Deirdre O’Donnell told us that it “just takes the complexity of accepting credit cards right out of the process. We think it saves time for them and it certainly saves time for us. I think our collection rates have really improved since we’ve had LawPay.”

“Online credit card payments are unsafe.”

As a lawyer, you’re already well aware of how important it is to keep your clients’ sensitive personal information safe. Naturally, when you accept credit cards as payments, you’ll need to protect their card data as well. However, keeping such data stored in your office, even on your work computer, can create a security risk.

Thankfully, online payment solutions can keep this data secure so you don’t have to. Look for an online payment solution that’s Payment Card Industry (PCI) Level 1 certified—the highest designation possible. These payment solutions are well equipped to protect payment data and will employ sophisticated security measures that your firm would otherwise not have access to. By letting your clients pay you through a secure online payment solution, you can take much of the liability of data security off your plate and place it in the hands of trusted security professionals. You’ll not only get a payment processor, but a payment data security specialist—all in one!

“I can’t accept credit cards and maintain IOLTA compliance.”

We hear you. You’re concerned about how credit card payments would work in light of the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct.

According to Rule 1.15, lawyers must be careful to ensure earned funds are deposited into an operating account, while a client’s funds go to a trust account. When accepting cash, checks, or other traditional forms of payment, it’s simply a matter of depositing the funds in the right place, but how does this work when using a credit card?

This is how an online payment solution designed specifically for legal professionals can make credit card payments both easy and ethical. For example, when payments are made through LawPay, your earned and unearned fees are always separated and deposited into their proper accounts. You can also rest easy knowing that LawPay will never allow any third-party debiting to occur from your IOLTA account.

If you want to accept credit cards without getting into hot water, your best bet is to use an online payment solution that understands the legal industry and was built from the ground up to anticipate and accommodate your needs.

These days, accepting online credit card payments is an essential part of running a modern law firm. Thankfully, it’s not only easier than ever to offer this option, but the benefits are overwhelming—simpler workflows, increased cash flow, better productivity in your firm, and best of all, happier clients who pay on-time and more frequently. What more could a lawyer ask for?

Ready to take your first step into the world of credit card payments? Get a head start with LawPay’s sample credit card authorization forms that you can use as part of your client intake forms.

Download now

TexasBarCLE receives ACLEA award for outstanding achievement in programming

Tue, 09/11/2018 - 05:45

TexasBarCLE staff members accept the ACLEA award.

The Association for Continuing Legal Education (ACLEA) has awarded TexasBarCLE one of only 16 annual awards granted to competitors representing more than 300 organizations.

ACLEA members are professionals in the fields of continuing legal education and legal publishing. The annual ACLEA’s Best Awards are highly competitive, and winning projects represent the highest level of achievement for the staff and volunteers involved.

TexasBarCLE received an Outstanding Achievement award in the Best Programming category for its “CLE Fifteen” and “Best of” online classes on July 31 at the ACLEA Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon.

A few years ago, TexasBarCLE experimented with the concept of bundling top-rated presentations from multi-day courses and offering them as the “Best of” each course when the videos went online. The concept was later expanded to create “CLE Fifteens,” longer classes that had at least 15 hours of CLE, including 3 hours of ethics, in order to satisfy a full year’s MCLE compliance requirement.

These online CLEs offer the busy lawyer the best presentations and most relevant topics from multiple courses in a given practice area – accessible from any computer or mobile device 24/7. MP3s are available as an option for offline listening. Attorneys are able to forego the costs of transportation, lodging, and lost billable hours, and can listen to the presentations at their own pace.

Links are provided for each topic’s video stream, MP3, article, and presentation slides so the attendee can easily navigate through the topics they want to hear and articles they want to read, in any order they choose. Once a program is completed, attorneys can claim credit for it directly from the viewing page.

TexasBarCLE now offers “CLE Fifteen” packages in nearly all practice areas: Administrative/Government, Business, Civil Appellate, Commercial Litigation, Consumer & Creditor, Criminal, Employment and Corporate Counsel, Estate Planning and Probate, Family Law, General Practice, Historical Perspectives, Immigration, Intellectual Property, LGBT Issues, General Litigation Practice, Oil/Gas and Energy, Personal Injury, Real Estate, Technology, and Trial Practice.

“CLE Fifteen” and “Best of” online classes provide expert faculty, deliver extensive coverage of Texas-specific law, and offer research-quality written materials. Check out the CLE Fifteen and Best of online classes on TexasBarCLE.com.

Savings on healthy choices

Fri, 09/07/2018 - 08:00

Your Member Benefit Program can help you make healthy choices for less. Visit the Health & Wellness, Sports & Outdoors, Family, Home & Garden, and Retail pages to start saving.

  • Weight Watchers — Getting started with Weight Watchers is now easier than ever. State Bar of Texas members save up to 37% on two months of Weight Watchers meetings with OnlinePlus in participating areas.
  • Diamondback Bicycles — Diamondback designs and builds performance bicycles for every rider at every level. Save 40% on the bike for you.
  • 23andMe — Discover genetic information about your ancestry, wellness, and more with 23andMe’s Health + Ancestry Service. Get $30 off each Health + Ancestry Service kit.
  • Glasses.com — State Bar of Texas members receive an extra 20% off orders of $100 or more on all brands sitewide. Each order includes free shipping, free CR-39 Plus lenses, and the Glasses.com 100% satisfaction guarantee.
  • Vitamix — Thanks to the Vitamix Employee Discount Program, you can enjoy exclusive savings on Vitamix blenders. For a limited time, buy a Certified Reconditioned Standard Programs blender with pre-program settings and a classic 64-ounce container or a Certified Reconditioned Next Generation with a low-profile container for 34% off the original price.
  • SLEEFS — SLEEFS designs and produces custom compression gear. You can save 25% off all purchases with code BENEPLACE25.
  • American Medical ID — In a medical emergency, a medical ID communicates your condition, medications, and allergies to ensure you receive proper care. Enjoy 10% off your purchase of a stylish medical ID bracelet or necklace.

Current offers provided by Beneplace.

For more information on other discounts you’re eligible for as a member of the State Bar of Texas, visit texasbar.com/benefits.

Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange
The Texas Bar Private Insurance Exchange is a multi-carrier private exchange designed for State Bar of Texas members and their staff and dependents. Available to both individuals and employer groups, the exchange offers a wide range of health insurance choices and more.

State Bar of Texas – Benefits & Services

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