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ABA recognizes Texas attorneys and law firms as Pro Bono Leaders

Fri, 01/25/2019 - 15:00

The American Bar Association Standing Committee on Pro Bono and Public Service recognized six Texas attorneys and the Texas offices of two law firms for their participation during 2018 in the Texas Legal Answers and ABA Free Legal Answers programs.

The attorneys recognized as ABA Free Legal Answers 2018 Pro Bono Leaders are Ujjayini Bose, of Match.com in Dallas; Richard Cahan, of the Law Office of Richard Cahan in Round Rock; Finis Cowan III of Houston; Ronald Dennis, of Ronald Ned Dennis, Attorney at Law in Marshall; Yu-cheng “Jack” Fan, of Fan Law Office in Dallas; and Wade Gibson, of Locke Lord in Dallas.

Fan currently has the highest number of questions answered in the nation, and has answered more than 1,500 questions since he joined Texas Legal Answers in the summer of 2017. His efforts were recently highlighted on the ABA’s blog.

Law firms recognized were Vinson & Elkins and Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld.

The ABA Standing Committee on Pro Bono and Public Service annually recognizes individual attorneys, law firms, and law departments that have provided extraordinary pro bono services through ABA Free Legal Answers. The individual attorneys each answered 50 or more civil legal questions through the program during the 2018 calendar year. Law firms or organization recipients collectively answered 75 or more questions during the same time period.

For more information about Texas Legal Answers, go to texas.freelegalanswers.org.

DVAP will host series of legal clinics for Dallas County residents

Fri, 01/25/2019 - 09:00

The Dallas Volunteer Attorney Program, an initiative of the Dallas Bar Association and Legal Aid of NorthWest Texas, is hosting 11 free legal clinics for county residents who meet financial guidelines. The clinics, which will be held throughout February, will offer legal advice and consultation in civil matters.

Applicants are asked to bring proof of income, identification, and legal papers. For more information, go to dallasvolunteerattorneyprogram.org.

Clinics begin at 5 p.m., with the exception of the veteran’s clinic, which begins at 1:30 p.m.

Schedules and locations:

East Dallas (Grace United Methodist Church St.—4105 Junius St., Dallas 75246)

  • Thursday—February 7 and February 21

South Dallas (Martin Luther King, Jr. Center—2922 MLK Blvd., Dallas 75215)

  • Tuesday—February 5, February 12,and February 26

West Dallas (2828 Fish Trap Rd., Dallas 75212)

  • Thursday—February 14 and February 28

Garland (Salvation Army—451 W. Avenue D, Garland 75040)

  • Thursday—February 21

Friendship West Baptist Church (2020 West Wheatland Rd., Dallas 75232)

  • Wednesday—February 20

St. Phillip’s Community Center (1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Dallas 75215)

  • Tuesday—February 19

Veterans Resource Center (for veterans and their families only—4900 S. Lancaster Rd., Dallas 75216)—1:30 p.m.

  • Friday—February 1

Alexandra Guio receives ABA YLD’s National Outstanding Lawyer Award

Thu, 01/24/2019 - 18:01

Alexandra Guio received the Wm. Reece Smith Jr. National Outstanding Lawyer Award from the American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division.

Each year, the award recognizes an ABA YLD member in good standing who exhibits professional excellence; service to the profession, bar, and community; and advancement of ethics and professional responsibility.

Guio, an assistant district attorney in Dallas County, was recognized for her work as a prosecutor. From 2015 to 2017, she was a member of the county’s sexual assault division, working cold cases and campaigning for the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative, a grant that funds the testing of approximately 4,000 rape kits and allows the county to fully investigate and prosecute cases. In November 2017, Guio moved to the 257th Judicial District Court, where she prosecutes felony cases, including aggravated robbery and murder cases.

Guio was also recognized for her role as a mentor. As a member of the Texas Young Lawyers Association, or TYLA, and the Dallas Bar Association, Guio has been a mentor for first-year law students at UNT Dallas School of Law and has coached them in mock trial competitions, as well as given them insight on work at the Dallas County District Attorney’s Office. She is also the law school liaison for the Mexican American Bar Association, or MABA, meeting with students for lunch and helping guide them through law school, including at her alma mater, SMU Dedman School of Law.

Guio helped screen 70 local election candidates with a MABA, screening committee and initiative. The effort educated candidates on the needs of the Mexican-American community in Dallas. She has also co-chaired the Dallas Young Lawyers Equal Access to Justice Committee, helping raise funds for the Dallas Attorney Volunteer Program.

“The ABA YLD will be hard pressed to find a more well-rounded candidate who exemplifies professional excellence, unparalleled service to the community and the profession, and the highest moral character,” TYLA President Sally Pretorius said in an award nomination letter to the ABA. “As you know, we encounter extraordinary young lawyers every day—all good people doing good things. It is no exaggeration as I submit to you that Ms. Guio, as young as she is in her career, surpasses them all.”

For more information about the Texas Young Lawyers Association, go to tyla.org.

Stories of Recovery: A ‘real alcoholic’

Wed, 01/23/2019 - 13:30

Editor’s note: This post, which has been updated, was originally published on June 15, 2015, as the 12th story in the Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program’s Stories of Recovery blog series, featuring attorneys in their own words. TLAP offers confidential assistance for lawyers, law students, and judges with substance abuse or mental health issues. Call TLAP at 1-800-343-8527 (TLAP) or find more information at tlaphelps.org.

I guess what astounds me the most about my personal struggle with alcohol is that despite growing up with alcoholism all around me (my dad has been in recovery for over 30 years), my impression of a “real alcoholic” was the type Hollywood often portrays: A person, residing under a bridge, with the entire contents of their belongings in a shopping cart. Never did it cross my mind that a “real alcoholic” could live in West Austin, run a successful business, and drive a Jaguar. Well, guess what? They can, and they do.

I also hadn’t experienced an awful childhood or any terrible trauma, which I also thought were necessary ingredients that made a “real alcoholic.” I have always had a wonderful and supportive family and group of friends. Both parents attended each dance recital and football game. Every sheet of construction paper I glued pinto beans and pasta onto adorned our family refrigerator. I don’t ever remember feeling unloved or unwanted growing up, not for one second.

What I know now is that alcoholism is a disease that doesn’t take into account race, religion, or income. It matters little how perfect or awful your life was or is. Some of us are predisposed to drink with impunity; others, like me, are not.

My love-hate affair with alcohol began when I was 13. I snuck several swigs of rum from my parents’ liquor cabinet. Here is what I remember most about it: I hated the smell, I hated the taste, and it made me cough. But, in a few minutes, that hamster in the wheel that was my brain quit running. For the first time I could remember, I wasn’t worried about what anyone thought about me. I wasn’t worried about what I made on my chemistry final. I wasn’t worried about anything.

Alcohol allowed me total freedom from my thoughts and insecurities. I was sold.

I continued to drink throughout high school, mainly on weekends. What began as sneaking a few swigs from the parents’ liquor cabinet became a series of elaborate efforts of obtaining alcohol under-age and frequent episodes of blackout drinking. I often think that if I’d spent as much effort and time studying and giving back to society as I did on trying to figure out how to get my hands on some beer for the weekend, I could possibly be a Nobel Prize recipient. Or at the very least, my name would be on the side of a respectable building.

My blackout drinking continued into my college years. As you can imagine, by attending the University of Texas and being a part of the Greek scene, my drinking habits did not seem very different from my cohorts. It felt normal to keep up the habits I had already formed in high school. Missing days of classes to sleep off hangovers was SOP, but I somehow managed to do well enough in my studies to get into UT Law.

My drinking in law school escalated. I needed to drink to fall asleep at night. And, for the first time in my drinking career, I began to acknowledge that drinking did not feel fun anymore. I started to feel like my life was out of control. But I was not ready to put alcohol down.

Then I passed the bar. Enter clients, deadlines, a paralyzing fear of failure, and a consistent level of alcohol consumption that would rival any Roman orgy. I can confidently say I was sober fewer days than drunk. The rule of weekend-only drinking was replaced by drinking daily after 12 p.m. If it were not for tolerant and brilliant co-workers swooping in to cover for me and my alcohol-induced mistakes, I have little doubt I would have been disbarred.

The truth was, I was so convinced I was an awful lawyer, and so full of self-loathing for all the destruction and pain my drinking was causing those around me, it got to the point where I did not care if I lived or died.

Several years ago on Mother’s Day, after drinking alcohol for nearly eight consecutive hours, I drove home.  For months leading up to that night, there were several times while driving home on the winding canyon-lined roads of Austin that I thought, All I have to do to end it all is drive off the road into these canyons.  And, that Mother’s Day night, I did. And I survived.  And I finally acknowledged I needed help.

Days later, after a phone call to the Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program, or TLAP, and my doctor, I was admitted into outpatient rehab. I was able to keep my job and get the help I needed at night. I remember surveying the room of my colleagues. We were teachers, lawyers, janitors, and housewives. We were from every demographic you could imagine, even West Austin.

I have been sober since that fateful Mother’s Day. Not a day passes without a feeling of sincere gratitude that my story does not include my having killed a family while on the road driving drunk, because it is by the grace of God that it does not. I owe my continued sobriety to TLAP and the TLAP community. Today, I am one grateful recovering alcoholic.

 

Free legal clinic for veterans in Tomball

Sat, 01/19/2019 - 12:00

Veterans can receive free legal advice at a clinic hosted by the Houston Northwest Bar Association, the Montgomery County Bar Association, and the Houston Bar Foundation’s Veterans Legal Initiative on Saturday, January 26.

The clinic will offer veterans and spouses of deceased veterans advice and counsel from volunteer attorneys in any area of law, including family law, wills and probate, consumer law, real estate and tax law, and disability and veterans benefits. Those who qualify for legal aid and are in need of ongoing legal representation may be assigned a pro bono attorney to take their case.

The clinic, which does not require an appointment, will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Tomball VA Outpatient Clinic, 1200 W. Main St., Tomball 77375.

For more information, go to hba.org or contact the Veterans Legal Initiative at (713) 759-1133.

To view a list of other free veteran legal clinics around the state, please go to the State Bar’s Texas Lawyers for Texas Veterans webpage at texasbar.com/veterans.

Longley: Board votes on chief disciplinary counsel, TYLA election issue

Fri, 01/18/2019 - 17:12

Editor’s Note: State Bar of Texas President Joe K. Longley sent the following message to members on Friday.

The State Bar of Texas Board of Directors met today in Austin. Highlights from the meeting are provided below.

Seana Willing

New chief disciplinary counsel named
The board voted unanimously to consent to the Commission for Lawyer Discipline’s selection of Seana Willing as the new chief disciplinary counsel. She will replace Linda Acevedo, who is retiring this month after 33 years of service to the State Bar and 10 years as chief disciplinary counsel. For the past two years, Ms. Willing has been executive director of the Texas Ethics Commission. She previously served the State Commission on Judicial Conduct for 18 years, including 14 years as executive director. She will now lead the Office of Chief Disciplinary Counsel, which administers the state’s attorney discipline system and represents the commission in disciplinary litigation.

TYLA voting eligibility issue
On a roll call vote, the board voted unanimously—with my abstention—to reaffirm Section 1.23 of the Board Policy Manual to maintain the status quo regarding voting in State Bar and Texas Young Lawyers Association elections. I abstained because of concerns over the constitutionality of the current practice of preventing non-TYLA members from voting in statewide elections for TYLA president-elect. Although I am open to all suggestions, my proposal is to give all active State Bar members the right to vote in the statewide election for TYLA president.

Budget approved for publication
The board voted unanimously to approve the proposed 2019-2020 fiscal year budget for publication in the March issue of the Texas Bar Journal. A public hearing will be held April 2 at the Texas Law Center in Austin, followed by a vote of the board on April 26 to submit the proposed budget to the Texas Supreme Court for review and approval. For the second straight year, the proposed budget will hold total general fund expenditures to under $44 million without a reduction in State Bar programs or services.

Committee review completed
The State Bar Act requires the board’s Executive Committee to conduct a comprehensive review of the standing committees biennially to determine whether there is a continued need for each committee and whether there is unnecessary overlap of committee activities. I served as the chair of the Committee Review Subcommittee, which completed a review of all State Bar standing committees. Overall, we concluded that:

  • our committee structure is working well,
  • there is a continuing need for all standing committees with some exceptions, and
  • that committees are working on mutually exclusive projects.

The board voted unanimously to approve the recommendations. A copy of the subcommittee’s report and its recommended changes is available here.

Transparency audit report accepted
The board accepted a transparency audit report by Weaver, an independent assurance, tax, and advisory firm. The February issue of the Texas Bar Journal will include a full report on the Weaver audit.

Board chair election set
Directors heard comments from the four candidates for 2019-2020 chair of the State Bar Board: Jerry Alexander (Dallas), Alison Colvin (Brownsville), Leslie Dippel (Austin), and Neil Kelly (Houston). At its April meeting, the board will vote by written ballot to elect the new chair.

New Supreme Court liaison, San Antonio director
It was our pleasure to welcome Texas Supreme Court Justice Debra Lehrmann as the court’s new liaison to the State Bar of Texas and the State Bar Board. Justice Lehrmann replaces Justice Phil Johnson, who retired from the court on December 31. Also, San Antonio attorney Marc E. Gravely was sworn in as the new State Bar director for District 10 (Bexar County), Place 1. He replaces Tom Keyser, who resigned from the board.

Resolutions
As mentioned above, Linda Acevedo is retiring as chief disciplinary counsel, and Justice Phil Johnson has retired from the Supreme Court. The board honored both of them with resolutions in recognition of their years of dedicated service to the State Bar and all Texans.

If you have any questions about the board meeting, please let me know. For more information on the board or to read meeting agendas and materials, go to texasbar.com/board.

Sincerely,

Joe K. Longley 
President, State Bar of Texas 2018-2019
Joe.Longley@texasbar.com

Houston attorney collecting baby supplies for Operation Homefront

Fri, 01/18/2019 - 15:47

The Law Office of David A. Fernandez is hosting a donation drive for Operation Homefront’s Star-Spangled Babies program from mid-January to the end of March. The program provides military families with early education tips, a support system, and baby supplies when finances are tight or a service member is deployed.

The firm is in need of learning and development toys 0-12 months, gyms, jumpers, soothers or sound machines, baby monitors, baby carriers/wraps, teethers, rattlers, stroller toys, push and pull toys, size 2 diapers, wipes, diaper cream, lotion, baby shampoo, onesies, blankets, and towels. Donated items can be dropped off at 2190 N. Loop West, Ste. 102, Houston 77018.

“Military families deserve to receive exceptional service and care from us, the civilians and communities they are protecting and serving,” said founding attorney David A. Fernandez. “Any way we can show we appreciate them matters. It’s important to give back and to teach our children to give back.”

Operation Homefront is a nonprofit focused on helping military families thrive. Ninety-two percent of its expenditures fund programs that help tens of thousands of families. It provides financial assistance, transitional and permanent housing, and family support services yearly to stop short-term needs from turning into long-term struggles.

For more information on how to directly donate to Operation Homefront, go to www.operationhomefront.org/donate.

Seana Willing selected as new chief disciplinary counsel

Fri, 01/18/2019 - 14:57

The State Bar of Texas Board of Directors voted unanimously Friday to consent to the Commission for Lawyer Discipline’s selection of Seana Willing as the new chief disciplinary counsel.

Willing served the State Commission on Judicial Conduct for 18 years —14 of those as executive director of the commission. For the past two years, Willing has been executive director of the Texas Ethics Commission.

“We believe that Ms. Willing’s demonstrated commitment to service and to ethics in government and the legal profession make her an excellent choice to lead us in our mission to serve the Texas attorney community and the public,” Noelle Reed, chair of the Commission for Lawyer Discipline, said.

Willing replaces Linda Acevedo who is retiring after 33 years of service to the State Bar. Acevedo served 10 years as chief disciplinary counsel.

Click here to read the full news release on Ms. Willing’s selection.

State Bar Board of Directors to meet January 18 in Austin

Thu, 01/17/2019 - 15:58

The State Bar of Texas Board of Directors will hold its quarterly meeting Friday, January 18 in Austin.

The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Texas Law Center, 1414 Colorado St. Members of the public are welcome to attend.

Click here to view the meeting agenda and materials.

Sign up now for free solo, small firm CLE

Mon, 01/14/2019 - 09:47

Registration is underway for the free CLE “Updates for Solo Practitioners and Small Firms.”

The CLE features updates and current issues facing general practitioners. It will include updates on criminal law, law practice management, family law, business succession planning, and State Bar of Texas happenings. The CLE will run from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 16 at the Texas Law Center, 1414 Colorado St. in Austin.

Earn 2.5 hours of free MCLE credit. Register here.

 

Newest Travis County and 3rd Court of Appeals judiciary sworn in

Wed, 01/09/2019 - 10:46

Investitures were held for the newest judges in Travis County and the state’s 3rd Court of Appeals.

Justices Thomas Baker, Chari Kelly, Edward Smith, and Gisela Triana were sworn in to the 3rd Court of Appeals on January 7 at the Austin Central Library’s Special Event Center.

Ceremonies for county judges took place the prior week. On January 3, the county welcomed Judge Chantal Eldridge, of the 331st District Court, and Judge Sylvia Holmes, Travis County Justice of the Peace, at the investiture held at the Blackwell-Thurman Criminal Justice Center in Austin.

On January 4 at the Heman Marion Sweatt Travis County Courthouse in Austin, Judge Maya Guerra Gamble, of the 459th District Court, and Judge Catherine Mauzy, of the 419th District Court, were sworn in.

From left: 3rd Court of Appeals Justices Thomas Baker, Chari Kelly, Gisela Triana, and Edward Smith, who were sworn in on January 7 at Austin Central Library’s Special Event Center. Photo by Matthew Chambers Photography

Entries sought for 2019 Texas Gavel Awards

Tue, 01/08/2019 - 13:32

The State Bar of Texas Public Affairs Committee announced it is seeking submissions for the 2019 Texas Gavel Awards, which honor outstanding journalism that fosters public understanding of the legal system.

Entries published or broadcast during the 2018 calendar year will be accepted for print, broadcast, and online categories until 5 p.m. March 29. There is no entry fee.

The awards will be presented at the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas’ annual conference in September. For more details about the Texas Gavel Awards, read the full news release.

Click here to read the 2018 winning entries.

Entries sought for 2019 Texas Gavel Awards

Tue, 01/08/2019 - 13:32

The State Bar of Texas Public Affairs Committee announced it is seeking submissions for the 2019 Texas Gavel Awards, which honor outstanding journalism that fosters public understanding of the legal system.

Entries published or broadcast during the 2018 calendar year will be accepted for print, broadcast, and online categories until 5 p.m. March 29. There is no entry fee.

The awards will be presented at the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas’ annual conference in September. For more details about the Texas Gavel Awards, read the full news release.

Click here to read the 2018 winning entries.

Technology: Living Spaces

Fri, 01/04/2019 - 12:00

Jessica Hoffmann on whether your smart home is friend or foe when litigation starts. To learn more about how to successfully run your practice, read the entire January issue at texasbar.com/tbj.

Technology: Living Spaces

Fri, 01/04/2019 - 12:00

Jessica Hoffmann on whether your smart home is friend or foe when litigation starts. To learn more about how to successfully run your practice, read the entire January issue at texasbar.com/tbj.

In Memoriam—December 2018

Thu, 01/03/2019 - 09:41

The State Bar of Texas’ Membership Department was informed in December 2018 of the deaths of these members. We join the officers and directors of the State Bar in expressing our deepest sympathy.

John C. Backus, 85, of Bend, Oregon, died August 3, 2018. He received his law degree from Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1972.
Terry Gene Collins, 75, of Rockport, died November 19, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of Houston Law Center and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1970.
Cristina Cooper, 51, of Austin, died December 4, 2018. She received her law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1992.
John Spencer Holleman Jr., 71, of Livingston, died November 6, 2018. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1972.
Robert E. Jack, 74, of Corpus Christi, died November 5, 2018. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1977.
Alvin G. Khoury, 82, of Longview, died November 21, 2018. He received his law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1959.
Edward Kliewer III, 73, of San Antonio, died December 8, 2018. He received his law degree from Texas Tech University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1973.
Gordon Morriss, 65, of Dallas, died October 26, 2017. He received his law degree from Texas Tech University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1977.
Charles E. Myers, 72, of Abilene, died November 28, 2018. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1969.
Jesse L. Nickerson III, 75, of Powderly, died July 19, 2018. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1973.
Ricardo D. Palacios, 75, of Encinal, died December 15, 2018. He received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1971.
Cread L. Ray Jr., 87, of Austin, died December 10, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1957.
Karl J. Russell, 70, of Houston, died January 20, 2018. He received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1973.
Deborah L. Schrier-Rape, 56, of Coronado, California, died June 27, 2018. She received her law degree from Stanford Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1993.
Jay Edward Tantzen, 60, of Bridge City, died November 12, 2018. He received his law degree from Oklahoma City University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1993.
Robert B. Todd, 78, of Taylor, died October 18, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of Houston Law Center and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1974.
Thomas G. Van Amburgh, 67, of Dallas, died December 15, 2018. He received his law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1976.
Ryan Wallace, 27, of Houston, died December 5, 2018. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law Houston and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 2018.

If you would like to have a memorial for a loved one published in the Texas Bar Journal, please go to texasbar.com/memorials. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact the Texas Bar Journal at (512) 427-1701 or toll-free at (800) 204-2222, ext. 1701.

In Memoriam—December 2018

Thu, 01/03/2019 - 09:41

The State Bar of Texas’ Membership Department was informed in December 2018 of the deaths of these members. We join the officers and directors of the State Bar in expressing our deepest sympathy.

John C. Backus, 85, of Bend, Oregon, died August 3, 2018. He received his law degree from Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1972.
Terry Gene Collins, 75, of Rockport, died November 19, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of Houston Law Center and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1970.
Cristina Cooper, 51, of Austin, died December 4, 2018. She received her law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1992.
John Spencer Holleman Jr., 71, of Livingston, died November 6, 2018. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1972.
Robert E. Jack, 74, of Corpus Christi, died November 5, 2018. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1977.
Alvin G. Khoury, 82, of Longview, died November 21, 2018. He received his law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1959.
Edward Kliewer III, 73, of San Antonio, died December 8, 2018. He received his law degree from Texas Tech University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1973.
Gordon Morriss, 65, of Dallas, died October 26, 2017. He received his law degree from Texas Tech University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1977.
Charles E. Myers, 72, of Abilene, died November 28, 2018. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1969.
Jesse L. Nickerson III, 75, of Powderly, died July 19, 2018. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1973.
Ricardo D. Palacios, 75, of Encinal, died December 15, 2018. He received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1971.
Cread L. Ray Jr., 87, of Austin, died December 10, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1957.
Karl J. Russell, 70, of Houston, died January 20, 2018. He received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1973.
Deborah L. Schrier-Rape, 56, of Coronado, California, died June 27, 2018. She received her law degree from Stanford Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1993.
Jay Edward Tantzen, 60, of Bridge City, died November 12, 2018. He received his law degree from Oklahoma City University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1993.
Robert B. Todd, 78, of Taylor, died October 18, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of Houston Law Center and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1974.
Thomas G. Van Amburgh, 67, of Dallas, died December 15, 2018. He received his law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1976.
Ryan Wallace, 27, of Houston, died December 5, 2018. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law Houston and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 2018.

If you would like to have a memorial for a loved one published in the Texas Bar Journal, please go to texasbar.com/memorials. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact the Texas Bar Journal at (512) 427-1701 or toll-free at (800) 204-2222, ext. 1701.

Subscribe to the State Bar of Texas Daily News Briefing

Wed, 01/02/2019 - 10:07

To keep up on the latest State Bar of Texas news as well as top Texas legal news, sign up for the State Bar of Texas’ Daily News Briefing.

The Daily News Briefing is a compilation of State Bar of Texas news and legal news stories culled from media across the state. The briefing is emailed each work day and includes the latest State Bar of Texas and Texas Young Lawyers Association podcast episodes as well as a quick link to the latest online version of the Texas Bar Journal. The Daily News Briefing is open to all individuals.

To subscribe go to texasbar.com/dailynews.

Subscribe to the State Bar of Texas Daily News Briefing

Wed, 01/02/2019 - 10:07

To keep up on the latest State Bar of Texas news as well as top Texas legal news, sign up for the State Bar of Texas’ Daily News Briefing.

The Daily News Briefing is a compilation of State Bar of Texas news and legal news stories culled from media across the state. The briefing is emailed each work day and includes the latest State Bar of Texas and Texas Young Lawyers Association podcast episodes as well as a quick link to the latest online version of the Texas Bar Journal. The Daily News Briefing is open to all individuals.

To subscribe go to texasbar.com/dailynews.

Texas Bar Journal Must-Reads for January

Wed, 01/02/2019 - 10:00

 

Ready to realize those New Year’s resolutions? Start with reading the Texas Bar Journal. Our editorial staff has you covered with highlights from the January issue. And don’t forget to check out Disciplinary Actions, Memorials, and Movers and Shakers.

‘A Couple Points on a Test’
Remarks from the high scorer of the Texas Bar Examination.
By Stephen Burbank

Living Spaces
Is your smart home friend or foe when litigation starts?
By Jessica Hoffman

Do You Suffer from Impostor Syndrome?
If you do, you are not alone.
By Martha McIntire Newman

Inflatables
What you need to know so you won’t get bounced.
By Kay K. Morgan

Pages